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March 02, 2011

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ZZ

Not sure why this is an important distinction.

Ivan Toblog

Kinda reminds about the story of the fella in the flood.
The cops came and warned him he should move to higher ground. He refused, saying God would take care of him.
Later when he had been forced to move up to the second floor, a boat came by and offered him rescue. He refused, saying God would take care of him.
Still later, he was on his roof and a helicopter crew offered to help him. He refused again, saying God would take care of him.
Later, at the Pearly Gates, he complained to St. Peter about not being saved by God.
St Peter replied, "what did you want? He sent you the cops, a boat and then a helicopter."
Some of us eventually get the message.

RecoveringInOA

Seems to me that it's an important distinction because of the sense of accessibility. If you believe that you have no relationship with God then you feel separated from God, like you and God have nothing to do with each other. When you realize that you have a relationship with God, that God is always there waiting for you to realize it, then you don't have to build a relationship from the ground up starting with inventing the wheel, but rather, all you have to do is open your eyes.

If you believe you have to start from scratch, it is an excuse to say that you have no relationship with God, which can become an excuse for all sorts of destructive thinking. If you believe that you always have a relationship with God and you just need to become aware of it, it puts the responsibility on you to become aware, and you run out of excuses.

There is also the comfort factor... feeling distant from God vs. feeling God close to you. God's out there and we have nothing to do with each other, versus God's right here with me, whether or not I have awareness of God's love and presence.

ZZ

I see. Yes, makes sense.

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